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>> are you ready, america? >> hi, everybody. i'm megan kelly. >> are you ready? are you ready? >> we're live in new york city for the "all american new year." let's go! megan: let's bring it! [captioning made possible by fox news channel] captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> it is "an all american new year." bill: good evening, america. welcome to our "all american new year." we are live. hello 2009. i'm bill hemmer. megan: hi, everybody. i'm megan kelly. we are thrilled to be here with you tonight and people right behind us and behind our camera. they are everywhere here. they are dropping the biggest ever crystal ball this year. we will bring it to you live! bill: indeed we are. it is way up there. megan: it is gorgeous and it is huge! bill: we also have a great team of reporters. with us, they will bring us some of the great new year's stories from the world over the next 90 minutes. we will be with them throughout the night. security is a big deal. megan: especially this year. police are saying they will have thousands of officers right here
arabia? >> well, the obvious is 9/11 for america. 15 of the 19 hijackers are saudis. i tried to explain in my book how it was basically a saudi quarrel fought out on american soil with american victims. al qaeda, bin laden dedicated to bringing down the house of saad couldn't do it in saudi arabia with the near enemy as they called him so they came to america and attacked the far enemy. you paid the price for your years of friendship and closeness with saudi arabia. tavis: i was about to ask why did we end up being at the top of that list. you explain it now. you talk about it in the book, the price that we had to pay for our friendship with the saudis. >> well, it's america who exploited, discovered and developed saudi oil. back in the 1930's, the saudis chose america rather than the british, rather than us because we had been meddling in the middle east. the king of saudi arabia at the time liked the idea that america were far away. they would come and develop the oil and go away. america is on the other side of the world. after the war, the second world war, suddenly, saudi arabia di
known black people in america to come to such a place of determination about how to face the conditions under which they were living. segregation. no right to vote. bad employment. lower or second class schooling. all of the above. and in dr. king's voice, i not only heard the passion but i also heard some clarity that the mission would not be short-term. that he was going for the long haul and not since the days of dr. dubois that i heard anybody speak with such affirmation and conviction. about our plight. tavis: what did you make of him on a personal level? obviously you have shared with us that you were taken by his presentation and by his commitment to the cause but what did you make of him on your first meeting on a personal level? >> first of all, i knew that he was 26 and i'm looking into the face of this 26-year-old, it was very difficult for me to fathom that he understood and knew so much. his maturity was well beyond his years and his academic information was well beyond the amount of schooling that he had had although he was already the possessor of a ph.d. he had done not
general. but much power lies with hillary clinton, secretary of state of america, sending thousands more troops of afghanistan to try to win the peace. once there, side conversations and exchanges on how to make it work. the lead up to the conference saw a stream of initiatives, sanctions dropped against some taliban leaders, debt relief for afghanistan of billions of dollars and others. for what has become a pressing global security challenge and a test of how to fix a failed state. >> by the middle of next year we have to turn the tide in the fight against the insurgency and also in our work to support afghan government in winning the trust of the people. so today, we affirm as an international community, that the increase in our military efforts must be matched with governance and economic development, a political and civilians surged to match and complement the current military surge. president karzai promised his government would play its part. it would fight corruption d much more. >> we will continue to reform our state institutions. we need to strengthen the leadership, managemen
america's future. and additional funding is provided by the following supporters -- >>> good evening, i'm martin savidge, thank you for joining us. it was an attack so damaging that one former intelligence official described it as the cia's pearl harbor. we're talking about the suicide bombing yesterday that killed eight americans, some of them cia employees. today a spokesman for the taliban claimed responsibility for the attack. saying a bomber entered the base last night and blew himself up. it was the worst loss for the cia since the war there began more than eight years ago. yesterday's attack took place at a remote outpost known as chapman in the province of khost, along the border with pakistan. this evening the associated press is reporting that the suicide bomber was invited on to the base by americans. according to a former senior intelligence official, the man was being courted as an informants and it was the first time he had been brought inside the camp. he was reportedly not searched. much of the cia's efforts in that region including drone attacks had been focused on the
that our progress was inevitable and that america was always distinned to succeed. but when the union was turned back in bull run and allies first landed in omaha beach, victory was very much in doubt. when the market crashed on black tuesday and civil rights marches were beaten on bloody sunday, the future was anything but certain. these were the times that tested the courage of our convictions and the strength of our union . despite all of our divisions and disagreements, our hesitations and our fears, america prevailed because we chose to move forward as one nation, as one people. again, we are tested. and again, we must answer history's call. one year ago, i took office amid two wars and economy rocked by a revere - severe recession. economy on the brink much collapse and deep in debt. experts said if we did not act we might face a second depression . so we acted. immediately and aggressively . one year later, the worst of the storm has passed. but the devastation remains. one in 10 americans still cannot find work. many businesses have shuttered, home values have declined, small
, to fundamentally transform america. our economy, our healthcare system. our partisan political ways. it has been a year since barack obama took the oath of office. sometimes his decisions as president have contradicted his promises as candidate. he even appears to be continuing some policies he once called mistakes. in many area, however, he has made more than good on his promise to change. fundamentally change our country. for some, obama is exactly the president he said he would be. for others, he is not. for voters, it often depends on what they thought they heard. tonight, a unique hour, the story of barack obama's campaign and first year in office in a way it hasn't been told before. in his own words. we begin with one of the biggest promises candidate obama made. to repair america's image around the world. so has president obama restored the united states prestige for damaged it with apologies? listen. >> i will restore our moral standing so that america is, once again, that last best hope for all who are called to the cause of freedom. >> president obama embarks on his first european swin
rights to health reform and tributes flowed in. we looked back at his life. >> good morning america, we awake to breaking news that senator edward kennedy political giant, has died. as we say a good and sad morning to you. >> teddy kennedy was being lauded for a lifetime which even at the last, he had been at the center. he had been a backer of barack obama for president. >> i barack obama do solemnly swear. >> on the day of his inauguration, he collapsed suffering from a brain tumor that had been diagnosed in may of last year. but despite his illness, he delivered the democratic nomination to the young contender. >> the hope rises again and the dream lives on. >> edward kennedy had once carried the dream himself. he was the youngest of the kennedy clan. when president kennedy was assassinated, his brother robert ran to succeed him. when he was killed, it was expected that edward kennedy would run. >> he was a good and decent man who saw wrong and tried to right it, saw suffering and tried to heal it, saw war and tried to stop it. >> but a mysterious accident dashed his hopes. he drove
america, our economy, our healthcare system, our partisan political ways. it has been a year since barack obama took the oath of office. sometimes his decisions as president have contradicted his promises as candidate. he even appears to be continuing some policies he once called mistakes. in many areas he has more than good made on his promise to change. fund amount fally change our country. obama for some he is exactly the president he said he would be, for others he is not. for voters it depends on what they thought they heard. tonight a unique hour. his campaign in a way that hasn't been told before in his own words. ee begin with one of the biggest promises he made to repair our image around the world. has president obama restored the united states prestige or damaged it with apologies? listen. (cheers) >> i will restore our moral standing so america is once again that last best hope for all who are called to the cause of freedom. >> president obama em barks on the first european swing focused on the languishing glowing economy. >> if you look at the source of this crisis the united
asia trip. he said i'm america's first pacific president. he struck a lot of conciliatory notes when he was china. japan and the united states don't want that story line. they push back a lot on that. they are a little bit skidish about that storyline. that's not one that they want to see out there. chris: that's funny. they wanted to be the country that's part or the world again. >> right? >> absolutely. and there is a difference between the obama policy and the bush policy. they don't want to lose that america should lead the world. we set the agenda. if obama loses that and we saw it late last year when he accepted the noble prize, that fed into the storyline that he doesn't necessarily believe in american exceptionalism. it's more that i want to be president of the world. it's a very effective one. and i don't think -- i think that's a constant in american politic, people want the president to believe in america exceptionalism. chris: what do you think that this president is tilting to the world? >> i'm always amazed by people's warmth towards me. at the the same time having a presi
. outside of washington in america, the voters are angry and the president knows it. there is some fury over bailouts and big bankers and big bonuses and no jobs. tonight, at the end of his first year in office, he gets to sum up the job and look at the future. as you can see, the chamber is already filling as members of the cab a net and white house staff file in. the first lady, michelle obama, is greeting her guests in the first lady's box in the gallery. for our coverage, david gregory and andrea mitchell are in the studio. chuck todd across town in the nbc washington newsroom and kelly o'donnell, among others of our reporting staff, is in the well of the house and the chamber itself tonight. she'll be reporting from there. earlier today, the white house pretty much put on a full court press briefing small groups of journalists on their message thus far and their aims going into tonight. among the gatherings, lunch, several of us attended with the president. david gregory, moderator of "meet the press" was among the guests. david, how would you sum up what you heard today, his state of m
and showed a willingness to criticize america's actions and all too often in the united states it starts by dictating and we don't know all of the factors involved in he had knowledge to the depth of the strains in europe -- relations when there was no reason in america could not restore the same respect in partnership america had with the muslim world as recently as 20 or 30 years ago. in other words, we have to go back 20 or 30 years to find a moment when there was a good working partnership so obama's recognized the mistrust and how far back it dated. and in this lies the essential appeal of obama's words to his cairo audience and he recognized the historic roots of the 21st century and a place that america roll out-- and the role they played. bring in the discussion back i have spent the past 20 years of my life teaching the history of the region and i did write the book. like president obama i do believe the historic background is essential for addressing current affairs and the complex issues in the middle east others a to pay far more attention was what deals with the arabs today.
but another network, one of the most famous pundits in america said that on day 12 of the clinton presidency, day 12. pundits were asking is his presidency over. >> he nearly broke through the ice a couple of times. >> he went on to serve another 2,190 days as president, left office the most popular president ever, y because he passed his program and worked. if barack obama can pass his program and it works, he'll be fine. >> hold on one second, campbell. i see the president of the united states has now left the holding area, and he's about to be introduced and walk into the chamber. the speaker, the introduction is about to happen. barry sullivan, the majority floor of services chief, will say the magic words, "madam speaker," and then wilson livingood, the house sergeant of arms will immediately follow with "the president of the united states." let's listen. this is one of those moments that you'll be hearing a lot of over the next few days and indeed over the next few years. >> madam speaker. >> madam speaker, the president of the united states. [ cheers and applause ] [ applause ] >> how
. america's economy was built on free market enterprise. it was built on these principles that allowed the private sector to grow and thrive and prosper and for our families to keep more of what we earn. where we are now in america in the last 11 months is seeing this reversal of those principles that were applied to build up our economy. all of a sudden we are thinking it is okay to grow debt in our country. it is okay to borrow from countries we will soon be so beholding to. it is okay to print money out of thin air and think everything is going to magically work out. fundamentally, everyone is equal in america, everyone has equal opportunity to earn, produce and build. the fundamentals of a strong economy have got to be applied again as they were like i said in the 80s when reagan faced a worse recession than today let's learn from that piece of american history and apply the same solutions. >> what about health care reform? i assume you want some health care reform, maybe i'm wrong. do we need health care reform? >> of course we do. rising costs are crushing some of our small busin
to find new markets, just as the competitors are finding. america is on the sidelines as the other -- if we are on the sidelines as other nations are doing this, we will lose jobs offshore. however, realizing the benefits also means enforcing those agreements to the trading partners so that will play by the rules. that is why i will continue to try to open global markets to strengthen the trade relations in asia and with partners like south korea, panama, and columbia. . and colombia. fourth, we need to invest in the skills and education of our people. now this year, this year we've broken through the stale mate between left and right by launching a national competition to improve our schools. and the idea here is simple. instead of rewarding failure, we only reward success. only reward success. in the status quo, we only invest in reform. reform that raises student achievement, inspiring students to compel in math and science, and turns around tailing -- failing school that steal the future of too many young americans from rural communities to the inner cities. in the 21st century
that our progress was inevitable that america was always destined to succeed. but when the union was turned back at bull run and the allies first landed at omaha beach victory was very much in doubt. when the market crashed on black tuesday and civil rights marches were beaten on bloody sunday, the future was anything but certain. these were the times that tested the courage of our convictions and the strength of our union and despite all our dwegses and -- divisions you and disagreements, our hesitations and our fears, america prevailed because we chose to move forward as one nation as one people. again we are tested and again we must answer history's call. one year ago i took office amid two wars an economy rocked by a severe recession, a financial system on the verge of collapse and a government deeply in debt. experts from across the political spectrum warned that if we did not act we might face a second depression. so we acted immediately and aggressively. and one year later the worst of the storm has passed. but the devastation remains. one in 10
'll want to learn all about it. many say it encapsulated many of the problems that america faces in the world at large. the best military report and military expert in the country tom ricks joins me to tell you about it. >>> while most of the focus of the nation and this show is on the hot spots around the world, what about the rest of the world? we'll talk to the famous scholar, kishore mahbubahni of singapore to get a different perspective on the world. let's get started. >>> all day long on cable, news talk shows we hear about how president obama is doing. on fox some say he's a socialist who's trying to indoctrinate our children, even as he mortgages their future. on msnbc he is the lonely hero fighting to give help to the sick, employ the jobless and end racism in our time. here on cnn, well, i'm on cnn, so today i want to see if we can get some kind of a clear-eyed look at what kind of a president he really is and what kind of a world he faces. so i gathered a panel of talented historians and writers. people who know greatness and the lack thereof when they see it to help m
say it encapsulated many of the problems that america faces in the war at large. the best military report, military expert in the country, tom bricks, joins me to tell you about it. while much of the focus of the nation and the show is on the hotspots around the world, what about the rest of the world? we will talk with the famous international writer and scholar of singapore to get a very different perspective on the world. let's get started. >>> all day long on cable, news talk shows, we hear about how president obama's doing. on fox, some say he's a socialist trying tune doctrine eight our children even as he mortgages their future. on msnbc, the lonely hero fighting to give help to the sick and employ the jobless and end racism in our time. and here on cnn, i'm on cnn, i wanted to see if we could get a clear look at what kind of a president he really is. what kind of a world he faces. i gathered panel of talented historians and writers. people who know greatness and the lack thereof when they see it help me accomplish this mission. walter isaacson has written terrific biographi
i don't think american elections should be bankrolled by america's most powerful interests. or works by foreign entities. they should be decided by the american people. i would urge democrats and republicans to pass a bill that helps correct it some of these problems. i'm also calling on congress to continue down the path of earmark reform. democrats and republicans. democrats and republicans. you trim some of the spending. you embraced some meaningful change. restoring the public trust demands more. for example, some members of congress post some earmark requests online. tonight i'm calling on congress to publish all earmark requests on a single website before there is a vote so the american people can see how their money is being spent. of course, none of these reforms will even happen if we don't also reform how we work with one another. now, i'm not naive. i never thought that the mere fact of my election would usher in peace and harmony and some post partisan era. i knew both parties that fed divisions deeply entrenched. open some issues, there are simply philosophical
-- we begin this week, i should say, with america's middle class. as you likely know, ground zero for the failing policies of recent american politics. we're, of course, talking about the millions struggling to make ends meet, while paying the price for so many of america's outdated systems. whether that's two wars with no clear exit strategy. you know the narrative. funding a financial structure that takes money from the middle class as opposed to lending it to them. or broken health care system. not to mention a massive, inefficient, opaque government that continues to run record deficits and be dominated by special interests in a culture of cultural expediency. those middle-class families are the ones seeing layoffs at the astounding pace we have reported over and over again on this show and so many other places. they're also the people who are either losing their homes or they're stuck in those homes because the value of their mortgage is so much more than the actual value of the property at this point. compare a family of four in 2007 and compare that same family in 1971. whe
, new direction or america risked failure in the war. every in the morning, he heads out to the battle field. he has another way. maps that shows the dangerous turn the war has taken. 2005, the yellow shows pockets of violence. and 2007, most of the country. antwooichb, more than 2,000 afghans killed or wounded. and now the surge with the pressure on general stanley mcchrystal to turn it around immediately. have you done it? have you turned the tide? >> i believe we have done it now. we are ra changed the way we operate and we are on the way to convince the afghan people we are here to protect them. >> 942 beths in afghanistan. 1,000 injuries here. general mccalfry has said that he foresees 400 to 500 casualties per month in the next few month. do americans have to brace themselves for 300 to 0 casualties a month in the months to come? >> i think americans need to understood this will be difficult. i won't predict casualty numbers. but i think it will be a difficult struggle in the months ahead. >> are those unimaginable numbers? >> i don't believe. it's a cost to the families and the
america's sake. this includes making sure these communities and people in them are coordinated effectively and held accountable at every level. meanwhile, the investigation into the christmas day incident continues, and we are learning more about the suspect. we know that he traveled to yemen, a cup project a country dealing with deadly insurgencies. -- a country dealing with deadly insurgencies. he was directed to attack that plane headed for america. this is not the first time this group has targeted us. they have bomb humani government facilities and our embassy in 2008, killing one american. i have made it a priority to strengthen our partnership with the yemeni government. even before christmas day, we have seen the results. plots have been disrupted and leaders eliminated. all those involved in the attempted act must know, you, too, will be held to account. it has been nearly a year since i stood on the steps of the u.s. capitol and took the oath of office as your president. with that 0 came the solemn responsibility i carry with me every moment of every day, the responsibility to pr
not be manufacturing the way we are. that is about the only thing made in america still are . the number one thing may be that these are a bunch of stupid young kids remember when issue was to legalize marijuana. it is now legal in california and new jersey. you can now get in 1 ounce a month if you have cancer or aids. the drugs are not all horrible. most of the horrible drugs are manufactured by are pharmaceutical companies and people abuse them. guest: the drug issue is very complicated. it is supply and demand for it is one that neither the europeans or the americans or latin americans have been able to come to grips with are the drugs are having a big effect in latin america. this was not true 20 years ago. we will not resolve this overnight. we need to focus on the issue now that the mexican society is bleeding very badly. united states needs to be concerned about that. secretary of state clinton said this last year. host: a dealer is asking if cuba got an earthquake like haiti, would we be there to rebuild a communist regime? guest: that is an issue of helping out a country that has terrible pr
policy toward latin america with a political science professor. and then a conversation on the future of the hybrid and electric car industry. "washington journal" is next. . . . the president's efforts to give the economy on track. that is this morning from "the washington post." the report breaking this morning about a plane crashed in the route, "the new york times" online have the story about the airplane crashing near beirut in stormy weather. officials said that 82 passengers and eight crew members were on board. we will update the information as we get it. ruth, democratic line. caller: i am not quite sure if we ever did what we were promising. to try and help people who were in trouble with their mortgages. i think that we took the wrong approach to begin with. so many people that were out of their homes. the fact ripples through the economy. -- the of fact ripples through the economy. let's help -- bethe effedctct te riffles through the economy. if the loan was renegotiated to what it was really worth, they can afford it, but the communication that happening. ho
as america's capital of antisemitism. jews were discriminated for everything, houses, public accommodation, even service clubs and automobile clubs. the rest of america was not much better. that is one of the reasons why a record of america with an administration beloved by jews raised only a feeble voice against the holocaust. that was then. now, of course, the twin cities are among the most enlightened communities of america, the place where they have had several jewish senators, several black officials, a flourishing of the community. it has transformed itself as america has been transformed. and i want to ask the question, what happened? how did that happen? we do not have time to get into many of the reasons but the most significant was the powerful tide of the civil rights revolution. it simply knocked down a closed society of my youth, knocking down the walls of the segregation and discrimination, opening the doors of equal opportunity to blacks and jews and all but -- and ultimately to women and to gaze and to people with disabilities. martin luther king jr. was not the first or on
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,134 (some duplicates have been removed)